Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Garden update

Well, I don't have much to report. My friend and I planted tomatoes, peppers (sweet and hot), basil, beets, chard, butternut squash, melons, cucumbers, garlic, shallots, nasturtiums, and crookneck squash.  We also had perennials: walking onions, rhubarb, thyme, mint, lemon verbena, and rosemary (not typically a perennial up here in New England, but it survived the winter and is now huge).

I mulched and mulched but still had weeds.  I really may just go with the black mulch cover next year.

The results:

Most of the basil isn't doing well.  There are three plants that are thriving; the rest are small and have a lot of yellowing or brown leaves.  I think all of the cool weather and rain at the beginning of the season did not serve it well.

The peppers are actually turning red quickly, as opposed to last year, when they didn't turn red until late September-early October.  So that is pretty surprising.

The rhubarb is prolific as usual!

The crookneck squash has produced two or three squash.

We got beets, replanted them, and three survived. Hmmm.

The chard is going gangbusters.

The garlic did well and we have happily used it all.  The shallots seemed to be doing well, but there were only two when I went to harvest them.  The walking onions are taking on a life of their own.

The perennial herbs are doing well. 

The butternut squash vines are everywhere, but I only see three or four gourds.

The cucumber died.

One melon plant survived, and it even started producing a melon, but something got in and took a bite out of it. STUPID ANIMALS.

The tomatoes--well, we had a couple of red cherry tomatoes.  The rest of the tomatoes--cherry, slicing, and roma--are green.  I may end up making a lot of pickled tomatoes again.  I've seen them turning red in other plots where I have a plot, and around town, but I've also seen other gardens with the same issue as my plot's.


6 comments:

  1. Tomatoes will turn red if you pick them green (before it frosts) and store them for awhile. We usually do that in the fall if a frost is predicted so as to save as many as possible. We stagger them--some in the dark basement and a few on the windowsill--so that they ripen gradually.

    We had fewer animal problems this year, thank goodness. :) Sorry they are pestering your garden.

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    1. Oh, I'll definitely try that as well!

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  2. Sounds like a wonderful garden! Too bad about the cucumber--that's one of my favorite vegetables; I definitely want to try growing chard next year as I heard it was pretty easy to grow (and fairly expensive in the stores).

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    1. It's very easy to grow and quite prolific. You just take one or two leaves from each plant--and more will grow in their places.

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  3. Lots of people are complaining about too much water here. But, at other places, people are complaining about drought. No one seems to have much luck this year. You did better than I!

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  4. We tried to plant some herbs as seeds and nothing sprouted. It was such a disappointment. What is the secret to getting them going?

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